Does Rowing Machine Build Calves

The rowing machine industry is actively appealing to the idea that rowing uses up to 84% of a person’s muscles. But let’s be honest: where did the 84 come from? There is no scientific study that mentions this percentage of muscle loading.

 In fact, all this came from the website of WaterRower, a well-known manufacturer of rowing machines, which does not mean the accuracy of what was written, especially since such a high indicator will definitely play in favor of purchasing their products.

 Is it all just a marketing ploy? If you have ever trained on rowing machines, then you will understand that if the indicated figure is far from reality, then not by much. So, let’s try to figure it out: is rowing involved so many muscles?


Rowing Builds Muscle?

In general, rowing is known as an excellent exercise that has beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system and lungs. But what many don’t know is that rowing machines are great for developing muscles.

 I get a lot of questions from people contemplating buying rowing and, often, the only thing that turns them off is doubts about rowing’s ability to “build” muscles.

My answer is simple: take a look at professional rowers. Massive shoulders, V-shaped back, muscular legs. Of course, I’ll be honest, rowing won’t look like a professional bodybuilder and rowing won’t give you the much-desired Herculean muscle gains – you will have to do weights to do all of this.

 However, if your goal is to look like Arnold Schwarzenegger, rowing is a great cardio option. To understand which muscle groups are involved in rowing, let’s look at how our body behaves in each of its stages.

 

Capture

This is the starting position. The legs are bent and the shins are located almost perpendicular to the floor. Fully extended arms hold the handle. 

The muscles of the back are relaxed, the press is, on the contrary, a little tense (therefore, the body is slightly tilted forward).

Muscles involved in the grip

  • muscles of the lower back, psoas major and minor
  • hamstrings, calf muscles, quadriceps, sartorius muscle, iliac muscle
  • triceps brachii
  •  

Overclocking

Acceleration is the longest stage of rowing. This is where the most muscle is involved, so your job is to create maximum effort.

 For a better understanding of overclocking, let’s divide it into some kind of stages. There will be three of them: push with legs, extension of the trunk and pull with hands.

 

Kicking

Acceleration begins with the contraction of the leg muscles. At this stage, it is they who are responsible for the speed of movement.

at the moment of pushing off with the legs, the calf muscles, as well as the quadriceps of the thighs, contract

  • the work at this stage also includes the muscles of the shoulders, serratus anterior muscles, latissimus dorsi, trapezius muscles, large and small round muscles, subscapularis muscles, supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles
  •  

Extension of the trunk

The second stage of acceleration begins when your legs are straight (but your knees are not “off”).

thigh muscles and gluteal muscles

  • erector spine, abdominal muscles
  • deltoid muscles, biceps muscles of the shoulders, brachialis
  •  

Hand pull

The third and final stage of acceleration involves the muscles of the shoulder girdle the most.

 The legs are fully extended here, the back is straight, the arms bent at the elbows press the handle of the simulator to the bottom of the pectoral muscles.

the work includes the latissimus dorsi, pectoralis major and minor, deltoid muscles, biceps muscles of the shoulders, rhomboid and trapezius muscles.

 

Completion

Completion is the final stage before recovery. Legs are straight, arms are bent and laid back, most of the muscles of the shoulder girdle are tense.

Muscles involved in completion

  • back muscles
  • deltoid muscles
  • biceps brachii
  • abdominal muscles
  • gluteal muscles
  • muscles of the back of the thigh
  • calf muscles
  •  

Recovery

After overclocking, you need recovery time to re-build maximum effort.

 During the recovery phase, you straighten your arms, bend forward a little, and then bend your legs, thereby returning to the grip position.

Muscles involved in recovery:

  • triceps brachii
  • abdominal muscles
  • triceps femoris
  • calf muscles.

The rowing machine industry is actively appealing to the idea that rowing uses up to 84% of a person’s muscles. But let’s be honest: where did the 84 come from? There is no scientific study that mentions this percentage of muscle loading.

 In fact, all this came from the website of WaterRower, a well-known manufacturer of rowing machines, which does not mean the accuracy of what was written, especially since such a high indicator will definitely play in favor of purchasing their products.

 Is it all just a marketing ploy? If you have ever trained on rowing machines, then you will understand that if the indicated figure is far from reality, then not by much. So, let’s try to figure it out: is rowing involved so many muscles?

 

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